Jamology  //  Pay to Play

This is what jammers do, this is what pros don’t do.

If you sit in on a public jam, you should put money in the tip jar, and you should patronize the bar (buy a drink). A good rule of thumb is “Five for the jar, five for the bar.”

If you don’t drink, buy a soft drink and tip heavy. Bars will not host live jams if it is not profitable. Karaoke is the enemy.

If you are in a bar with a live band that is not charging a cover charge, you should put money in the jar. Support your local musicians.

Some musicians will say they would never pay to play, but their goal is to be the professional musicians. Until they are the pros, and the venue is paying them, they should pay to jam.

Some experienced jammers are going to use this site to coordinate beginner jams. Beginners should contribute to the advanced jammer if you like their jam.

Skill Levels

  • Beginner- Level 1

    Someone just starting to play an instrument, which includes their own voice (singers), can only play one or two songs, cannot play entire songs, does not know many chords, can...

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  • Intermediate – Level 2

    A jammer that knows several songs, can play several chords and can move between them easily, understands timing and counts.

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  • Advanced – Level 3

    A jammer that can play many songs, understands the I-IV-V concept, beginning to solo but not proficient, proficient in backing roles, not able to lead a band on stage (yet).

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  • Experienced - Level 4

    A jammer proficient at their type of music, has played in a band that has played on stage regularly, knows many complete songs and understands many beats and rhythms, can lead a...

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  • Professional – Level 5

    A musician who plays for money/pay, makes their living from music (playing, selling instruments or lessons, in the music business).

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